Monday, September 04, 2006

Smoke, Smoke, Smoke that Rack of Ribs

After a summer of slothfulness, we fired up the smoker this morning to try our first ribs ever, $20.00 worth, hopefully 2 dinners . A smoker is not like a grill, where you can start the fire, toss on a steak or a few burgers, turn them over once and eat. No. no. no.

First of all, we had to make the rub, in spite of the fact that I have a whole spice shelf from Penzey's. www.penzeys.com.

While the ribs are lounging around the kitchen with the rub on, the fire has to be started, a complicated process due to the fact that some real wood chunks are going to be burned, in this case hickory. So finally, the fire (after 2 hours, to coincide with the time the ribs are standing with the rub on, ( "aye, there's the rub!") is ready. We put the ribs in the rack. Of course immediately the smallest section falls out and I jerry rig some bamboo skewers to make sure that nothing is going to fall out. Lid goes on, smoke comes out of vents, all is well.

Now the recipe recommends smoking a a certain temperatures, and Significant Other and I trade dumb looks. I go back to the web site and discover that a candy thermometer placed in the top went will give a passable reading. I dig out the old thermometer and we have a proper reading. 225 degrees.

Back from our walk and the temperature is down. More charcoal. And yet more charcoal. Take a peek. Ribs look yummy. I make the cole slaw and the sauce to be brushed on after cooking. Read smoker cook book while I wait.
Not diet fare, kids.

Back to web site to find test for doneness. Not done yet. This is a fantastic web site. Has everything you didn't know enough to ask about smoking on the Weber Smoker.
www.virtualweberbullet.com

I'll try the chicken recipe next. Then we're going to smoke some trout. Maybe a turkey breast. Next year, we'll do a brisket. This smoking is a learn-as-you-go trial and error business. The salmon was incredible, by the way, and the chicken breast was also one for the books. Wish I had some fried okra. Reading cookbooks is usually a bad idea.

I also promised myself to bake bread once I "retired," but that hasn't happened yet either. Proficiency in using the smoker and baking artisan breads. Well, one of these days.

With the chicken parm, we had sauteed escarole last night, a Martha Stewart recipe, and it was very good. Beaucoup garlic. Grapeshot loves garlic. One always feels so righteous eating Dark Green Stuff.

Now I need to do some real work, all the while anticipating finger lickin' good.

Bon Apetite, you all.


Grapeshot

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