Wednesday, November 17, 2010

Thanksgiving: Taking Sides

From recipematcher.com - the read McCoy
Taking sides.  Nope, not talking about family arguments.  I remember my mom and her brothers arguing politics (2 Dems, 2 Republicans) and my grandma getting more and more nervous and twisting her handkerchief.

The sides I'm taking about are side dishesThe Boston Globe had a whole food section devoted to them today.  My post yesterday was about a charming little sweet potato side dish that can make a cook's reputation.  Today we're doing, Ta Da!  Green Bean Casserole from Scratch.  And I mean REALLY from scratch, the only processed item being the onion rings, and hell, we just can't do without those, right?
You will use fresh green beans and make your own white sauce and saute your own mushrooms, and everything is 100% delicious. It's even simple if you are a moderately experienced cook.

The recipe is from the November/December 2006 Cook's Illustrated.
Here is the link. Green Bean Casserole from Scratch

It serves 10 to 12 and the leftovers are great.  Sit back and enjoy the compliments.  You deserve them. 

Thanksgiving observations.  It's not stuffing, if it's not inside the bird.  It's dressing.

It's not gravy unless it's thickened with flour, it's sauce.  Let's take our word choices seriously.

Thanksgiving is everyone's favorite holiday because except for the food chores, generally shared, there's not a lot to do.  O.K., vacuum the dining room, etc.  and maybe rent chairs or dishes, but compared to the hoo ha around Christmas, Thanksgiving is a slam dunk.

Last words:  don't ever go to a French restaurant for a traditional American Thanksgiving meal.  They don't understand the genre, so to speak.  I love French foods, but it takes an American cook to do a proper Thanksgiving.

Onward,

Grapeshot

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